Special Public Lecture Series

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A Special Public Lecture by Nobel Laureate
Prof. William D. Phillips (NOBEL PRIZE IN PHYSICS 1997)

Scheduled on: 17TH FEBRUARY 2021 (9:30-11:30 AM IST)


Title:
A New Measure: The revolutionary quantum reform of the international metric system.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER
Prof. Phillips was born to William Cornelius Phillips of Juniata, Pennsylvania and Mary Catherine Savino of Ripacandida, Italy. He graduated from Juniata College in 1970 summa cum laude. After that he received his physics doctorate from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. In 1978 he joined NIST. In 1996, he received the Albert A. Michelson Medal from The Franklin

Prof. Phillips doctoral thesis concerned the magnetic moment of the proton in H 2 O. He later did some work with Bose–Einstein condensates. In 1997, he won the Nobel Prize in Physics together with Prof. Claude Cohen-Tannoudji and Prof. Steven Chu for his contributions to laser cooling, a technique to slow the movement of gaseous atoms in order to better study them, at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, and especially for his invention of the Zeeman slower. Prof. Phillips is also a Professor of Physics, at University of Maryland, College Park.

Prof. Phillips is one of the 20 American recipients of the Nobel Prize in Physics to sign a letter addressed to President George W. Bush in May 2008, urging him to "reverse the damage done to basic science research in the Fiscal Year 2008 Omnibus Appropriations Bill" by requesting additional emergency funding for the Department of Energy’s Office of Science, the National Science Foundation, and the National Institute of Standards and Technology.

He is one of the 35 Nobel laureates who signed a letter urging President Obama to provide a stable $15 billion per year support for clean energy research, technology and demonstration. Prof. Phillips is also a member of the USA Science and Engineering Festival's Advisory Board.

A Special Public Lecture by Nobel Laureate
Prof. David J. Wineland(NOBEL PRIZE IN PHYSICS 2012)

Scheduled on: 23RD FEBRUARY 2021 (9:40-11:30 AM IST)


Title:
Atomic Clocks.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER
Prof. David Jeffrey Wineland, is an American Nobel-laureate physicist at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Physics laboratory. His work included advances in optics, specifically laser-cooling trapped ions and using ions for quantum- computing operations. He was awarded the 2012 Nobel Prize in Physics, jointly with Prof. Serge Haroche, for "ground-breaking experimental methods that enable measuring and manipulation of individual quantum systems".

Prof. Wineland was born in Wauwatosa, Wisconsin on February 24, 1944. Prof. Wineland graduated from Encina High School in Sacramento in 1961. He received his bachelor's degree in Physics from the University of California, Berkeley in 1965 and his master's and doctoral degrees in Physics from Harvard University. He completed his PhD in 1970, supervised by Norman Foster Ramsey, Jr. He then performed postdoctoral research in Hans Dehmelt's group at the University of Washington where he investigated electrons in ion traps. In January 2018, Prof. Wineland moved to the Department of Physics University of Oregon as a Knight Research Professor, while still being engaged with the Ion Storage Group at NIST in a consulting role. His NIST group uses trapped ions in many experiments on fundamental Physics, and quantum state control. They have demonstrated optical techniques to prepare ground, superposition and entangled states. This work has led to advances in spectroscopy, atomic clocks and quantum information. In 1995, he created the first single atom quantum logic gate and was the first to quantum teleport information in massive particles in 2004. Prof. Wineland implemented the most precise

Prof. Wineland is a fellow of the American Physical Society and the American Optical Society and was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1992.